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Blanton Museum of Art
museum in Austin, Texas
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Arty Fact

Blanton Museum of Art
museum in Austin, Texas
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200 E Martin Luther King Jr Blvd
Austin, Texas
United States

More about Blanton Museum of Art

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Contributor

Although the city’s tagline is “Keep Austin weird,” there’s nothing strange about the Blanton Museum of Art and its excellent collection.

Boasting an encyclopedic collection with more than a few highlights, the Blanton Museum of Art is the largest and most comprehensive art collection in all of Central Texas, which is saying something because Texas is HUGE. To show off this great collection and appeal to more Millennials and Gen Z’ers, the Blanton has recently joined the Getty and the Met in making their collection available online to decorate the buildings on your island in Animal Crossing.

Named after Jack S. Blanton, the museum actually wasn’t always called the Blanton, as its regulars affectionately refer to it. When it was originally founded, it was the Archer M. Huntington Gallery. Archer M. Huntington was the son of Arabella and Collis P. Huntington, and Arabella is the star of this show. Born to a poor, rural family, Arabella was a social climber whose personality eventually inspired the character of Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind. Her first husband was a man referred to only as Mr. Worsham, who died shortly after their wedding. Arabella gave birth to her son Archer during this time; however, it is suspected that her second husband, the railroad tycoon Collis P. Huntington, may have been Archer’s father all along. Collis died in 1900, but Arabella quickly rebounded with a third marriage to Collis’s nephew, the equally rich railroad magnate Henry E. Huntington. A love for art, philanthropy, and museums run in the family. Together, Arabella and Henry collected the art and lived in the home that would later become the Huntington Library.

Using his immense wealth for the greater good, Archer also funded a wide range of museums and cultural and ecological sites around the country. Archer loved art so much that he even married an artist. His second wife, Anna Vaughn Hyatt, was known for her sculptures. In 1927, a Mrs. T. S. Maxey donated Anna’s sculpture Diana of the Chase to the University of Texas at Austin. Archer decided that the university needed an art gallery to house the sculpture, along with the over a thousand books from the Huntington estate that he also gave. He even donated the land for the museum, which finally opened in 1963 in his name.

Fortunately for the Blanton, the generosity didn’t stop there. In 1997, the Houston Endowment gave the museum $12 million in honor of Jack S. Blanton, the company’s former chairman. Blanton, an oil executive who attended the University of Texas, was involved in bettering the Austin arts and culture scene, which has grown into the weird and wonderful place we know today. 

 

Sources

Sources

  1. Blanton Museum of Art. “About.” https://blantonmuseum.org/about/. Accessed 7 May 2020.
  2. David Patrick Columbia’s New York Social Diary. “His mother’s son.” https://web.archive.org/web/20061022151816/http://www.newyorksocialdiary.... Accessed 7 May 2020.
  3. Jasinski, Laurie E. “Huntington, Archer Milton.” Texas State Historical Association. 15 June 2010. https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhu77. Accessed 7 May 2020.
  4. Lakins, Shelby. “Bring the Blanton to Animal Crossing!” Blog. Blanton Museum of Art. https://blantonmuseum.org/2020/04/bring-the-blanton-to-animal-crossing/. Accessed 7 May 2020.
  5. Statesman. “University of Texas Benefactor Jack S. Blanton Dies at 86.” 30 December 2013. https://web.archive.org/web/20150721062025/http://www.statesman.com/news.... Accessed 7 May 2020.
  6. The Huntington. “About.” https://www.huntington.org/about. Accessed 7 May 2020.
  7. The University of Texas System. “Jack Sawtelle Blanton.” Former Regents. https://www.utsystem.edu/board-of-regents/former-regents/jack-sawtelle-b.... Accessed 7 May 2020.
  8. Visit Austin. “Blanton Museum of Art.” Attractions. https://www.austintexas.org/listings/blanton-museum-of-art/1580/. Accessed 7 May 2020.
  9. Visit Austin. “Visiting the Blanton Museum of Art.” Austin Insider Blog. 24 April 2018. https://www.austintexas.org/austin-insider-blog/post/blanton-museum-of-art/. Accessed 7 May 2020.

Featured Content

Here is what Wikipedia says about Blanton Museum of Art

The Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (often referred to as the Blanton or the BMA) at the University of Texas at Austin is one of the largest university art museums in the U.S. with 189,340 square feet devoted to temporary exhibitions, permanent collection galleries, storage, administrative offices, classrooms, a print study room, an auditorium, shop, and cafe. The Blanton's permanent collection consists of almost 18,000 works, with significant holdings of modern and contemporary art, Latin American art, Old Master paintings, and prints and drawings from Europe, the United States, and Latin America.

Check out the full Wikipedia article about Blanton Museum of Art.