Artworks
Rose and Silver: The Princess from the Land of Porcelain
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White lady plays dress-up in Whistler's Rose and Silver: The Princess from the Land of Porcelain.

Japan was all the rage at this point and served as inspiration for this Caucasian woman’s wardrobe.

Christine Spartali served as the model. 

Whistler's large signature was rather unappealing and prevented several people, including Christine's father, from purchasing the painting. 

Its provenance was not very well documented but it was eventually purchased by Frederick Leyland, a weathly shipping magnate. He displayed the painting in his Asian fetish room designed by Thomas Jeckyll. Leyland decided that the old room clashed with the new painting and hired Whistler to redo the entire thing. See Harmony in Blue and Gold: The Peacock Room for what happened afterwards.

After Leyland's death the painting bounced around for a bit until it was purchased by Charles Lang Freer in 1903 for $18,240. A year later he also purchased The Peacock Room and donated the entire thing to the Smithsonian. 

 

The work is also known as La Princesse du pays de la porcelaine or just The Princess from the Land of Porcelain.

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Here is what Wikipedia says about The Princess from the Land of Porcelain

Rose and Silver: The Princess from the Land of Porcelain (better known as The Princess from the Land of Porcelain; also known by the French title La Princesse du pays de la porcelaine) is a painting by American-born artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler. It was painted between 1863 and 1865. The painting currently hangs above the fireplace in The Peacock Room at the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Description

Princess depicts a beautiful Western woman wearing a Hanfu (a kind of Chinese traditional clothing) and standing amidst numerous Asian objects, including a rug and screen as well as some porcelain. She holds a hand fan and looks at the viewer "wistfully". The entirety is rendered in an impressionistic manner.Princess's frame is decorated with a similar motif to the painting, with interlocking circles and numerous rectangles.

Aiko Okamoto-MacPhall notes that Whistler at the time he painted Princess often used large amounts of gold color, such as in his similarly themed Caprice in Purple and Gold No.2: The Gold Screen. Although the painting itself does not include any shades of gold, while displayed at the home of British shipping magnate Frederick Leyland it was set in a gold and blue interior.

Check out the full Wikipedia article about The Princess from the Land of Porcelain.