Place
Gallery of the Academy [Venice]
museum gallery of pre-19th-century art in Venice, northern Italy
Disclaimer

Disclaimer

Images

We do our best to use images that are open source. If you feel we have used an image of yours inappropriately please let us know and we will fix it.

Accuracy

Our writing can be punchy but we do our level best to ensure the material is accurate. If you believe we have made a mistake, please let us know.

Visits

If you are planning to see an artwork, please keep in mind that while the art we cover is held in permanent collections, pieces are sometimes removed from display for renovation or traveling exhibitions.

Gallery of the Academy [Venice]
museum gallery of pre-19th-century art in Venice, northern Italy
0
Be the first to vote…

Campo Della Carità, 1050
Venezia
Italy

Contributor

The Gallerie dell’Accademia is, hands down, the best place to see some art, eat a panino and soak up some beautiful views of Venice.

It exists at the foot of the Accademia Bridge, one of the most famous bridges in Venice and the precise sport where almost every postcard photo ever has been taken. Although the Accademia seems very intimate compared to the chaos and fervor of the Venice Biennale, for instance, it is by no means a small beast; it’s a history lesson of Renaissance flourish in Venice, and almost every work displayed is a stand-alone masterpiece. In other words, you might not want to go on a time crunch or else, like me, you’ll be apologizing under your breath as you speed past Titians and Tintorettos

We have Napoleon Bonaparte to thank for this artistic repository, which has become the largest state museum in Venice following a twelve year restoration by Venetian architect Tobia Scarpa which doubled the exhibition space, making it larger than the Uffizi in Florence. The building—partially designed by Andrea Palladio—dates back to 1343 and was originally inhabited by the Scuola Grande della Carità, the oldest of six confraternities in Venice at the time. 

Eventually, Napoleon ordered closed many churches and religious institutions in Venice with the intention of compiling all of the art in one place for students to observe. The Scuola was closed down and replaced with a School of Fine Arts (the Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia). The occupancy finally changed again in 2004 when the School of Fine Arts separated from the Accademia and moved to a new location. Since then, the building has been the permanent home of the Gallerie dell’Accademia with the church of Santa Maria della Carità and the monastery of the Canonici Lateranensi comprising part of the complex.

In 2015, Paola Marini was named director, with the intention that she will breathe new life into the museum and bring global attention to the collection. 

Beautiful (and vintage!) views of the building can be seen in Katharine Hepburn’s 1955 film, Summertime.

 

Sources

Sources

  1. Marks, Thomas. "The Accademia in Venice is falling to pieces." Apollo Magazine. https://www.apollo-magazine.com/the-accademia-in-venice-is-falling-to-pi... (accessed 7 June 2018).
  2. "Gallerie dell'Accademia." Timeout Venice. http://www.timeout.com/venice/museums/venue/1:22562/gallerie-dellaccad... (accessed 7 June 2018).
  3. Valente, Francesca. "With Tobia Scarpa's restoration of the Accademia Galleries, the museum complex becomes the largest state museum in Italy." L'Italo-Americano. http://www.italoamericano.org/story/2015-1-9/Accademia (accessed 6 June 2018).

Featured Content

Here is what Wikipedia says about Gallerie dell'Accademia

The Gallerie dell'Accademia is a museum gallery of pre-19th-century art in Venice, northern Italy. It is housed in the Scuola della Carità on the south bank of the Grand Canal, within the sestiere of Dorsoduro. It was originally the gallery of the Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia, the art academy of Venice, from which it became independent in 1879, and for which the Ponte dell'Accademia and the Accademia boat landing station for the vaporetto water bus are named. The two institutions remained in the same building until 2004, when the art school moved to the Ospedale degli Incurabili.

Check out the full Wikipedia article about Gallerie dell'Accademia.